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SOC Employment Descriptions

Standard Occupation Classification. Detailed descriptions of high paying jobs that could possibly be open in your area. Find the right occupation for you.

11-1000 Top Executives

11-1010 Chief Executives
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-1011 Chief Executives
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-1021 General and Operations Managers

11-1021 General and Operations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations, overseeing multiple departments or locations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services. Usually manage through subordinate supervisors. Excludes First-Line Supervisors.

Illustrative examples: Department Store Manager, General Superintendent, Operational Risk Manager, Radio Station Manager

11-1011 Chief Executives
Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.

Illustrative examples: Admiral, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer, Governor, School Superintendent, University President

11-1020 General and Operations Managers

Illustrative examples: City Council Member, Senator, Tribal Council Member

11-2000 Advertising, Marketing, Promotions, Public Relations, and Sales Managers

11-1030 Legislators
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-1031 Legislators

11-1031 Legislators
Develop, introduce, or enact laws and statutes at the local, tribal, state, or federal level. Includes only workers in elected positions.

11-2010 Advertising and Promotions Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-2011 Advertising and Promotions Managers

11-2011 Advertising and Promotions Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate advertising policies and programs or produce collateral materials, such as posters, contests, coupons, or giveaways, to create extra interest in the purchase of a product or service for a department, an entire organization, or on an account basis.

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 2

Illustrative examples: Advertising Director, Advertising Executive, Promotions Director

11-2020 Marketing and Sales Managers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

11-2021 Marketing Managers

11-2022 Sales Managers

11-2021 Marketing Managers

Illustrative examples: District Sales Manager, Export Manager, Regional Sales Manager, Sales Director

11-2030 Public Relations and Fundraising Managers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

11-2032 Public Relations Managers

11-2033 Fundraising Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate marketing policies and programs, such as determining the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors and identify potential customers. Develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm’s profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm’s customers are satisfied. Oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.

Illustrative examples: Internet Marketing Manager, Marketing Administrator, Marketing Director

11-2022 Sales Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer.
Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers. Plan, direct, or coordinate activities to solicit and maintain funds for special projects or nonprofit organizations.

Illustrative examples: Donor Relations Manager, Foundation Director, Funding Coordinator, Fundraising Director

11-3000 Operations Specialties Managers

11-2032 Public Relations Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities designed to create or maintain a favorable public image or raise issue awareness for their organization or client.

Illustrative examples: Public Affairs Director, Publicity Director

11-2033 Fundraising Managers

11-3010 Administrative Services and Facilities Managers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

11-3012 Administrative Services Managers

11-3013 Facilities Managers

11-3012 Administrative Services Managers

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 3

Illustrative examples: Records and Information Manager, Records Management Director, University Registrar

11-3013 Facilities Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate operations and functionalities of facilities and buildings. May include surrounding grounds or multiple facilities of an organization’s campus. Excludes “Administrative Services Managers” (11-3012), “Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers” (11-9141), “First-Line Supervisors of Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Workers” (37-1010), “First-Line Supervisors of Mechanics and Repairers” (49-1011), and “Maintenance and Repair Workers, General” (49-9071).

Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, and other office support services. Medical records administrators are included in “Medical and Health Services Managers” (11-9111). Excludes “Facilities Managers” (11-3013) and “Purchasing Managers” (11-3061).

11-3021 Computer and Information Systems Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, systems analysis, and computer programming. Excludes “Computer Occupations” (15-1211 through 15-1299).

Illustrative examples: Chief Technology Officer, Information Technology Systems Director, Management Information Systems Director

11-3030 Financial Managers

Illustrative examples: Conference Center Manager, Director of University Housing, Stadium Manager

11-3020 Computer and Information Systems Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-3021 Computer and Information Systems Managers

11-3050 Industrial Production Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-3051 Industrial Production Managers

11-3051 Industrial Production Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.

11-3031 Financial Managers

11-3031 Financial Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment. Excludes “Financial Risk Specialists” (13-2054).

Illustrative examples: Bank Branch Manager, Comptroller, Financial Director

Illustrative examples: Manufacturing Director, Plant Manager, Production Control Manager

11-3060 Purchasing Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-3061 Purchasing Managers

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 4

11-3061 Purchasing Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products, and services. Includes wholesale or retail trade merchandising managers and procurement managers.

Illustrative examples: Contracting Manager, Procurement Manager, Purchasing Director

11-3070 Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

11-3110 Compensation and Benefits Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-3111 Compensation and Benefits Managers

11-3111 Compensation and Benefits Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate compensation and benefits activities of an organization. Job analysis and position description managers are included in “Human Resources Managers” (11-3121).

11-3071 Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers

11-3071 Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.

Illustrative examples: Distribution Center Manager, Traffic Safety Administrator, Warehouse Manager

11-3121 Human Resources Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate human resources activities and staff of an organization. Excludes managers who primarily focus on compensation and benefits (11-3111) and training and development (11-3131).

Illustrative examples: Job Analysis Manager, Labor Relations Director, Personnel Manager, Position Description Manager

11-3130 Training and Development Managers
Illustrative examples: Compensation Director, Employee Benefits Director, Wage and Salary Administrator

11-3120 Human Resources Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-3121 Human Resources Managers

11-9000 Other Management Occupations
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-3131 Training and Development Managers

11-3131 Training and Development Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the training and development activities and staff of an organization.

Illustrative examples: E-Learning Manager, Employee Development Director, Labor Training Manager

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 5

11-9010 Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9013 Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers

11-9020 Construction Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9021 Construction Managers

11-9021 Construction Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, budgeting, and implementation. Includes managers in specialized construction fields, such as carpentry or plumbing.

11-9013 Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the management or operation of farms, ranches, greenhouses, aquacultural operations, nurseries, timber tracts, or other agricultural establishments. May hire, train, and supervise farm workers or contract for services to carry out the day-to-day activities of the managed operation. May engage in or supervise planting, cultivating, harvesting, and financial and marketing activities. Excludes “First-Line Supervisors of Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers” (45-1011).

Illustrative examples: Animal Husbandry Manager, Dairy Farm Manager, Fish Hatchery Manager, Orchard Plan, direct, or coordinate academic or nonacademic activities of preschools or childcare centers and programs, including before- and after-school care. Excludes “Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education” (25-2011) and “Childcare Workers” (39-9011).

Illustrative examples: Childcare Center Administrator, Head Start Director, Preschool Director

11-9032 Education Administrators, Kindergarten through Secondary
Plan, direct, or coordinate the academic, administrative, or auxiliary activities of kindergarten, elementary, or secondary schools.

Illustrative examples: Construction Coordinator, Construction Superintendent, General Contractor

11-9030 Education and Childcare Administrators
This broad occupation includes the following four detailed occupations:

11-9031 Education and Childcare Administrators, Preschool and Daycare

11-9032 Education Administrators, Kindergarten through Secondary

11-9033 Education Administrators, Postsecondary

11-9039 Education Administrators, All Other

11-9031 Education and Childcare Administrators, Preschool and Daycare

Illustrative examples: Director of Student Services, Provost, University Dean, University Department Chair

Illustrative examples: Elementary School Principal, High School Principal, Middle School Principal

11-9033 Education Administrators, Postsecondary
Plan, direct, or coordinate student instruction, administration, and services, as well as other research and educational activities, at postsecondary institutions, including universities, colleges, and junior and community colleges.

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 6

11-9039 Education Administrators, All Other
All education administrators not listed separately.

11-9040 Architectural and Engineering Managers

11-9050 Food Service Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9051 Food Service Managers

11-9051 Food Service Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages. Excludes “Chefs and Head Cooks” (35-1011).

This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9041 Architectural and Engineering Managers

11-9041 Architectural and Engineering Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as architecture and engineering or research and development in these fields. Excludes “Natural Sciences Managers” (11-9121).

Illustrative examples: Engineering Design Manager, Global Engineering Manager, Mechanical Engineering

11-9071 Gambling Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate gambling operations in a casino. May formulate house rules.

Illustrative examples: Casino Manager, Slot Operations Director, Table Games Manager

11-9072 Entertainment and Recreation Managers, Except Gambling

Illustrative examples: Banquet Director, Food Service Director, Tavern Operator

11-9070 Entertainment and Recreation Managers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

11-9071 Gambling Managers

11-9072 Entertainment and Recreation Managers, Except Gambling

11-9081 Lodging Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that provides lodging and other accommodations. Excludes “Food Service Managers” (11-9051) in lodging establishments.

Illustrative examples: Bed and Breakfast Innkeeper, Hotel Manager, Innkeeper Plan, direct, or coordinate entertainment and recreational activities and operations of a recreational facility, including cruise ships and parks.

Illustrative examples: Amusement Park Manager, Fitness Club Manager, Marina Club Manager, Skating Rink Manager, Ski Resort Manager

11-9080 Lodging Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9081 Lodging Managers

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 7

Illustrative examples: Chief Medical Information Officer, Clinic Director, Clinical Informatics Director, Health Information Services Manager, Hospital Administrator, Medical Records Administrator, Mental Health Program Manager

11-9120 Natural Sciences Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9121 Natural Sciences Managers

11-9121 Natural Sciences Managers

11-9110 Medical and Health Services Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9111 Medical and Health Services Managers

11-9111 Medical and Health Services Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.

11-9131 Postmasters and Mail Superintendents
Plan, direct, or coordinate operational, administrative, management, and support services of a U.S. post office; or coordinate activities of workers engaged in postal and related work in assigned post office.
Illustrative examples: Postal Supervisor, Postmaster Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, statistics, and research and development in these fields. Excludes “Computer and Information Systems Managers” (11-3021) and “Architecture and Engineering Managers” (11-9041).

Illustrative examples: Agricultural Research Director, Geophysical Manager, Ocean Program Administrator

11-9130 Postmasters and Mail Superintendents
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9131 Postmasters and Mail Superintendents

Illustrative examples: Apartment Manager, Building Rental Manager, Leasing Property Manager

11-9150 Social and Community Service Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9151 Social and Community Service Managers

11-9151 Social and Community Service Managers

11-9140 Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9141 Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers

11-9141 Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the selling, buying, leasing, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties. Includes managers of homeowner and condominium associations, rented or leased housing units, buildings, or land (including rights-of-way).

11-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS 8

11-9161 Emergency Management Directors
Plan and direct disaster response or crisis management activities, provide disaster preparedness training, and prepare emergency plans and procedures for natural (e.g., hurricanes, floods, earthquakes), wartime, or technological (e.g., nuclear power plant emergencies or hazardous materials spills) disasters or hostage situations.

Illustrative examples: Disaster Response Director, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, Public Safety Director Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization’s budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.

Illustrative examples: Child Welfare Director, Family Service Center Director, Youth Program Director

11-9160 Emergency Management Directors
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9161 Emergency Management Directors
Illustrative examples: Funeral Home Director

11-9179 Personal Service Managers, All Other
All personal service managers not listed separately. Excludes “Financial Specialists” (13-2000). Daycare Managers are included in Education and Childcare Administrators, Preschool and Daycare (11-9031).
Illustrative examples: Day Spa Director, Nail Salon Manager, Travel Agency Manager

11-9170 Personal Service Managers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

11-9171 Funeral Home Managers

11-9179 Personal Service Managers, All Other

11-9171 Funeral Home Managers
Plan, direct, or coordinate the services or resources of funeral homes. Includes activities such as determining prices for services or merchandise and managing the facilities of funeral homes. Excludes “Morticians, Undertakers, and Funeral Arrangers” (39-4031).

Illustrative examples: Clerk of Court, Social Science Manager, Utilities Manager

11-9190 Miscellaneous Managers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

11-9199 Managers, All Other

11-9199 Managers, All Other
All managers not listed separately.

13-0000 MANAGEMENT OCCUPATIONS
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

13-1031 Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators

13-1032 Insurance Appraisers, Auto Damage

13-1023 Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products
Purchase machinery, equipment, tools, parts, supplies, or services necessary for the operation of an establishment. Purchase raw or semi-finished materials for manufacturing. May negotiate contracts. Excludes “Buyers and Purchasing Agents, Farm Products” (13-1021) and “Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products” (13-1022).

Illustrative examples: Equipment, Supplies, and Tools Purchasing Agent, Radio Time Buyer

13-1030 Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators

13-1022 Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products
Buy merchandise or commodities, other than farm products, for resale to consumers at the wholesale or retail level, including both durable and non-durable goods. Analyze past buying trends, sales records, price, and quality of merchandise to determine value and yield. Select, order, and authorize payment for merchandise according to contractual agreements. May conduct meetings with sales personnel and introduce new products. May negotiate contracts. Includes assistant wholesale and retail buyers of non-farm products. Excludes “Procurement Clerks” (43-3061).

Illustrative examples: Gold Buyer, Merchandise Buyer
This broad occupation includes the following three detailed occupations:

13-1021 Buyers and Purchasing Agents, Farm Products

13-1022 Wholesale and Retail Buyers, Except Farm Products

13-1023 Purchasing Agents, Except Wholesale, Retail, and Farm Products

13-1021 Buyers and Purchasing Agents, Farm Products
Purchase farm products either for further processing or resale. Includes tree farm contractors, grain brokers and market operators, grain buyers, and tobacco buyers. May negotiate contracts.

Illustrative examples: Cotton Broker, Fruit Buyer, Livestock Buyer

13-1011 Agents and Business Managers of Artists, Performers, and Athletes
Represent and promote artists, performers, and athletes in dealings with current or prospective employers. May handle contract negotiation and other business matters for clients.

Illustrative examples: Band Manager, Literary Agent, Theatrical Agent

13-1020 Buyers and Purchasing Agents

13-1000 Business Operations Specialists

13-1010 Agents and Business Managers of Artists, Performers, and Athletes
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1011 Agents and Business Managers of Artists, Performers, and Athletes

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 10
Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.

Illustrative examples: Construction Job Cost Estimator, Crating and Moving Estimator, Production Cost Estimator

13-1070 Human Resources Workers
This broad occupation includes the following three detailed occupations:

13-1071 Human Resources Specialists

13-1074 Farm Labor Contractors

13-1075 Labor Relations Specialists

Illustrative examples: Driver’s License Examiner, Environmental Compliance Inspector, Equal Employment Opportunity Officer

13-1050 Cost Estimators
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1051 Cost Estimators

13-1051 Cost Estimators

13-1040 Compliance Officers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1041 Compliance Officers

13-1041 Compliance Officers
Examine, evaluate, and investigate eligibility for or conformity with laws and regulations governing contract compliance of licenses and permits, and perform other compliance and enforcement inspection and analysis activities not classified elsewhere. Excludes “Financial Examiners” (13-2061), “Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents” (13-2081), “Occupational Health and Safety Specialists” (19-5011), “Occupational Health and Safety Technicians” (19-5012), “Transportation Security Screeners” (33-9093), “Agricultural Inspectors” (45-2011), “Construction and Building Inspectors” (47-4011), and “Transportation Inspectors” (53-6051).

13-1032 Insurance Appraisers, Auto Damage
Appraise automobile or other vehicle damage to determine repair costs for insurance claim settlement. Prepare insurance forms to indicate repair cost or cost estimates and recommendations. May seek agreement with automotive repair shop on repair costs.

Illustrative examples: Automobile Damage Appraiser, Vehicle Damage Appraiser

13-1031 Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators
Review settled claims to determine that payments and settlements are made in accordance with company practices and procedures. Confer with legal counsel on claims requiring litigation. May also settle insurance claims. Excludes “Fire Inspectors and Investigators” (33-2021).

Illustrative examples: Fire Claims Adjuster, Health Insurance Adjuster, Property and Casualty Insurance Claims Examiner

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 11
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1111 Management Analysts

13-1111 Management Analysts

13-1082 Project Management Specialists
Analyze and coordinate the schedule, timeline, procurement, staffing, and budget of a product or service on a per project basis. Lead and guide the work of technical staff. May serve as a point of contact for the client or customer. Excludes “Management Occupations” (11-0000), “Logisticians” (13-1081), “Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners” (13-1121), and “Production, Planning, and Expediting Clerks” (43-5061).
Illustrative examples: Design Project Management Specialists, Movie Project Management Specialists

13-1110 Management Analysts

13-1081 Logisticians
Analyze and coordinate the ongoing logistical functions of a firm or organization. Responsible for the entire life cycle of a product, including acquisition, distribution, internal allocation, delivery, and final disposal of resources. Excludes “Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers” (11-3071) and “Project Management Specialists” (13-1082).

Illustrative examples: Logistics Analyst, Logistics Planner, Logistics Specialist
Resolve disputes between workers and managers, negotiate collective bargaining agreements, or coordinate grievance procedures to handle employee complaints. Excludes equal employment opportunity (EEO) officers, who are included in “Compliance Officers” (13-1041).

Illustrative examples: Employee Relations Specialist, Labor Relations Consultant, Union Representative

13-1080 Logisticians and Project Management Specialists
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

13-1081 Logisticians

13-1082 Project Management Specialists

13-1074 Farm Labor Contractors
Recruit and hire seasonal or temporary agricultural laborers. May transport, house, and provide meals for workers.

Illustrative examples: Harvesting Contractor

13-1075 Labor Relations Specialists

13-1071 Human Resources Specialists
Recruit, screen, interview, or place individuals within an organization. May perform other activities in multiple human resources areas. Excludes “Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists” (13-1141) and “Training and Development Specialists” (13-1151).

Illustrative examples: Human Resources Generalist, Personnel Recruiter, Staffing Coordinator, Student Recruiter, Volunteer Coordinator

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 12

13-1150 Training and Development Specialists
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1151 Training and Development Specialists

13-1151 Training and Development Specialists
Design or conduct work-related training and development programs to improve individual skills or organizational performance. May analyze organizational training needs or evaluate training effectiveness. Excludes “Career/Technical Education Teachers, Postsecondary” (25-1194) and “Other Teachers and Instructors” (25-3000). Flight instructors are included with “Aircraft Pilots and Flight Engineers” (53-2010).

This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1141 Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists

13-1141 Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists
Conduct programs of compensation and benefits and job analysis for employer. May specialize in specific areas, such as position classification and pension programs.
Illustrative examples: Employee Benefits Specialist, Job Analyst, Retirement Plan Specialist

13-1131 Fundraisers
Organize activities to raise funds or otherwise solicit and gather monetary donations or other gifts for an organization. May design and produce promotional materials. May also raise awareness of the organization’s work, goals, and financial needs.

Illustrative examples: Campaign Fundraiser, Donor Relations Officer, Fundraising Officer

13-1140 Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists
Illustrative examples: Conference Planner, Corporate Meeting Planner, Wedding Planner

13-1130 Fundraisers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1131 Fundraisers

13-1120 Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1121 Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners

13-1121 Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners
Coordinate activities of staff, convention personnel, or clients to make arrangements for group meetings, events, or conventions.

Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants. Excludes “Computer Systems Analysts” (15-1211) and “Operations Research Analysts” (15-2031).

Illustrative examples: Business Management Analyst, Business Process Consultant, Industrial Analyst, University Institutional Researcher

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 13

13-2020 Property Appraisers and Assessors
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

13-2022 Appraisers of Personal and Business Property

13-2023 Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate

13-2022 Appraisers of Personal and Business Property

13-2011 Accountants and Auditors
Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data. Excludes “Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents” (13-2081).

Illustrative examples: Certified Public Accountant, Field Auditor, Internal Auditor

13-2000 Financial Specialists

13-2010 Accountants and Auditors
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-2011 Accountants and Auditors
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1199 Business Operations Specialists, All Other

13-1199 Business Operations Specialists, All Other
All business operations specialists not listed separately.

Illustrative examples: Mystery Shopper, Ship Purser

13-1161 Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists
Research conditions in local, regional, national, or online markets. Gather information to determine potential sales of a product or service, or plan a marketing or advertising campaign. May gather information on competitors, prices, sales, and methods of marketing and distribution. May employ search marketing tactics, analyze web metrics, and develop recommendations to increase search engine ranking and visibility to target markets. Excludes “Web and Digital Interface Designers” (15-1255), “Art Directors” (27-1011), “Graphic Designers” (27-1024), and “Public Relations Specialists” (27-3031).

Illustrative examples: Advertising Analyst, Market Research Specialist, Marketing Consultant, Marketing Forecaster, Search Marketing Strategist

13-1190 Miscellaneous Business Operations Specialists

Illustrative examples: Computer Software Training Specialist, Computer Training Specialist, Corporate Trainer, Insurance Employee Trainer

13-1160 Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-1161 Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 14

13-2051 Financial and Investment Analysts
Conduct quantitative analyses of information involving investment programs or financial data of public or private institutions, including valuation of businesses. Excludes “Budget Analysts” (13-2031), “Financial Risk Specialists”(13-2054), and “Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents” (41-3031).

Illustrative examples: Corporate Financial Analyst, Corporate Securities Research Analyst, Institutional Commodity Analyst, Organizational Investment Analyst

Illustrative examples: Credit Assessment Analyst, Credit Risk Analyst

13-2050 Financial Analysts and Advisors
This broad occupation includes the following four detailed occupations:

13-2051 Financial and Investment Analysts

13-2052 Personal Financial Advisors

13-2053 Insurance Underwriters

13-2054 Financial Risk Specialists

13-2040 Credit Analysts
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-2041 Credit Analysts

13-2041 Credit Analysts
Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making. Excludes “Financial Risk Specialists” (13-2054).

This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-2031 Budget Analysts

13-2031 Budget Analysts
Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations.
Analyze budgeting and accounting reports. Excludes “Financial and Investment Analysts” (13-2051).

Illustrative examples: Budget Examiner, Budget Officer, Cost Analyst

Illustrative examples: Estate Appraiser, Machinery Appraiser, Personal Property Assessor

13-2023 Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate
Appraise real estate, exclusively, and estimate its fair value. May assess taxes in accordance with prescribed schedules. Excludes “Appraisers of Personal and Business Property” (13-2022).

13-2030 Budget Analysts
Appraise and estimate the fair value of tangible personal or business property, such as jewelry, art, antiques, collectibles, and equipment. Includes workers who appraise both personal and business property as well as real estate. May also appraise land. Excludes “Claims Adjusters, Examiners, and Investigators” (13-1031), “Insurance Appraisers, Auto Damage” (13-1032), “Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate” (13-2023), and “Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents” (13-2081).

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 15

13-2072 Loan Officers

13-2071 Credit Counselors
Advise and educate individuals or organizations on acquiring and managing debt. May provide guidance in determining the best type of loan and explain loan requirements or restrictions. May help develop debt management plans or student financial aid packages. May advise on credit issues, or provide budget, mortgage, bankruptcy, or student financial aid counseling.

Illustrative examples: Debt Management Counselor, Student Financial Aid Counselor, Student Loan Counselor Enforce or ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing financial and securities institutions and financial and real estate transactions. May examine, verify, or authenticate records.

Illustrative examples: Bank Examiner, Financial Compliance Examiner, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Specialist

13-2070 Credit Counselors and Loan Officers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

13-2071 Credit Counselors

13-2072 Loan Officers

Illustrative examples: Financial Risk Analyst

13-2060 Financial Examiners
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-2061 Financial Examiners

13-2061 Financial Examiners

Illustrative examples: Automobile and Property Underwriter, Bond Underwriter, Insurance Analyst

13-2054 Financial Risk Specialists
Analyze and measure exposure to credit and market risk threatening the assets, earning capacity, or economic state of an organization. May make recommendations to limit risk. Excludes “Credit Analysts” (13-2041).

Advise clients on financial plans using knowledge of tax and investment strategies, securities, insurance, pension plans, and real estate. Duties include assessing clients’ assets, liabilities, cash flow, insurance coverage, tax status, and financial objectives. May also buy and sell financial assets for clients. Excludes “Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents” (41-3031).

Illustrative examples: Estate Planner, Individual Pension Adviser, Personal Investment Adviser

13-2053 Insurance Underwriters
Review individual applications for insurance to evaluate degree of risk involved and determine acceptance of applications.

13-2052 Personal Financial Advisors

13-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS 16

Illustrative examples: Bail Bondsman, Executor of Estate, Foreign Exchange Trader

13-2090 Miscellaneous Financial Specialists
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

13-2099 Financial Specialists, All Other

13-2099 Financial Specialists, All Other

All financial specialists not listed separately.

13-2082 Tax Preparers
Prepare tax returns for individuals or small businesses. Excludes “Accountants and Auditors” (13-2011).

Illustrative examples: Income Tax Advisor, Income Tax Preparer, Licensed Tax Consultant

This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

13-2081 Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents

13-2082 Tax Preparers

13-2081 Tax Examiners and Collectors, and Revenue Agents
Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.

Illustrative examples: Internal Revenue Service Agent, Revenue Collector, Tax Investigator
Evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of commercial, real estate, or credit loans. Advise borrowers on financial status and payment methods. Includes mortgage loan officers and agents, collection analysts, loan servicing officers, loan underwriters, and payday loan officers.

Illustrative examples: Commercial Lender, Loan Reviewer, Payday Loan Officer, Real Estate Loan Officer

13-2080 Tax Examiners, Collectors and Preparers, and Revenue Agents

15-0000 BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL OPERATIONS OCCUPATIONS

15-1230 Computer Support Specialists
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

15-1231 Computer Network Support Specialists

15-1232 Computer User Support Specialists

15-1231 Computer Network Support Specialists
Analyze, test, troubleshoot, and evaluate existing network systems, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), cloud networks, servers, and other data communications networks. Perform network maintenance to ensure networks operate correctly with minimal interruption. Excludes “Computer Network Architects” (15-1241) and “Network and Computer Systems Administrators” (15-1244).

15-1221 Computer and Information Research Scientists
Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.

Illustrative examples: Computational Theory Scientist, Control System Computer Scientist, Programming Methodology and Languages Researcher Plan, implement, upgrade, or monitor security measures for the protection of computer networks and information. Assess system vulnerabilities for security risks and propose and implement risk mitigation strategies. May ensure appropriate security controls are in place that will safeguard digital files and vital electronic infrastructure. May respond to computer security breaches and viruses. Excludes “Computer Network Architects” (15-1241).

Illustrative examples: Computer Security Specialist, IT Risk Specialist, Network Security Analyst

15-1220 Computer and Information Research Scientists
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-1221 Computer and Information Research Scientists

15-1211 Computer Systems Analysts
Analyze science, engineering, business, and other data processing problems to develop and implement solutions to complex applications problems, system administration issues, or network concerns. Perform systems management and integration functions, improve existing computer systems, and review computer system capabilities, workflow, and schedule limitations. May analyze or recommend commercially available software.

Illustrative examples: Applications Analyst, Data Processing Systems Analyst, Information Systems Analyst, Systems Architect

15-1212 Information Security Analysts

15-1200 Computer Occupations

15-1210 Computer and Information Analysts
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

15-1211 Computer Systems Analysts

15-1212 Information Security Analysts

15-0000 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS 18

15-1244 Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Illustrative examples: Database Programmer, Database Security Administrator

15-1243 Database Architects
Design strategies for enterprise databases, data warehouse systems, and multidimensional networks. Set standards for database operations, programming, query processes, and security. Model, design, and construct large relational databases or data warehouses. Create and optimize data models for warehouse infrastructure and workflow. Integrate new systems with existing warehouse structure and refine system performance and functionality. Excludes “Database Administrators” (15-1242).

Illustrative examples: Data Architect, Data Integration Specialist, Data Warehousing Specialist, Database Developer

Illustrative examples: Computer Network Engineer, Network Designer, Network Developer

15-1242 Database Administrators
Administer, test, and implement computer databases, applying knowledge of database management systems. Coordinate changes to computer databases. Identify, investigate, and resolve database performance issues, database capacity, and database scalability. May plan, coordinate, and implement security measures to safeguard computer databases. Excludes “Information Security Analysts” (15-1212) and “Database Architects” (15-1243).

15-1240 Database and Network Administrators and Architects
This broad occupation includes the following four detailed occupations:

15-1241 Computer Network Architects

15-1242 Database Administrators

15-1243 Database Architects

15-1244 Network and Computer Systems Administrators

15-1241 Computer Network Architects
Design and implement computer and information networks, such as local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), intranets, extranets, and other data communications networks. Perform network modeling, analysis, and planning, including analysis of capacity needs for network infrastructures. May also design network and computer security measures. May research and recommend network and data communications hardware and software.
Excludes “Information Security Analysts” (15-1212), “Computer Network Support Specialists” (15-1231), and “Network and Computer Systems Administrators” (15-1244).

Illustrative examples: Network Diagnostic Support Specialist, Network Support Technician, Network Technician

15-1232 Computer User Support Specialists
Provide technical assistance to computer users. Answer questions or resolve computer problems for clients in person, via telephone, or electronically. May provide assistance concerning the use of computer hardware and software, including printing, installation, word processing, electronic mail, and operating systems. Excludes “Network and Computer Systems Administrators” (15-1244).

Illustrative examples: End-User Support Specialist, Help Desk Technician, IT Support Specialist

15-0000 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS 19

15-1253 Software Quality Assurance Analysts and Testers
Develop and execute software tests to identify software problems and their causes. Test system modifications to prepare for implementation. Document software and application defects using a bug tracking system and report defects to software or web developers. Create and maintain databases of known defects. May participate in software design reviews to provide input on functional requirements, operational characteristics, product designs, and schedules.
Illustrative examples: Applications Tester, Software Quality Assurance Technician, Software Quality Control Specialist, Software Quality Engineer, Software Test Engineer

Illustrative examples: Applications Programmer, Computer Language Coder, IT Programmer, Systems Programmer

15-1252 Software Developers
Research, design, and develop computer and network software or specialized utility programs. Analyze user needs and develop software solutions, applying principles and techniques of computer science, engineering, and mathematical analysis. Update software or enhance existing software capabilities. May work with computer hardware engineers to integrate hardware and software systems, and develop specifications and performance requirements. May maintain databases within an application area, working individually or coordinating database development as part of a team.

Illustrative examples: Computer Applications Engineer, Computer Systems Engineer, Mobile Applications Developer, Software Applications Architect, Software Engineer, Systems Software Developer

15-1250 Software and Web Developers, Programmers, and Testers
This broad occupation includes the following five detailed occupations:

15-1251 Computer Programmers

15-1252 Software Developers

15-1253 Software Quality Assurance Analysts and Testers

15-1254 Web Developers

15-1255 Web and Digital Interface Designers

15-1251 Computer Programmers
Create, modify, and test the code and scripts that allow computer applications to run. Work from specifications drawn up by software and web developers or other individuals. May develop and write computer programs to store, locate, and retrieve specific documents, data, and information. Install, configure, and maintain an organization’s local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), data communications network, operating systems, and physical and virtual servers. Perform system monitoring and verify the integrity and availability of hardware, network, and server resources and systems. Review system and application logs and verify completion of scheduled jobs, including system backups. Analyze network and server resource consumption and control user access. Install and upgrade software and maintain software licenses. May assist in network modeling, analysis, planning, and coordination between network and data communications hardware and software. Excludes “Information Security Analysts” (15-1212), “Computer Network Support Specialists” (15-1231), and “Computer User Support Specialists” (15-1232).

Illustrative examples: Network Analyst, Network Coordinator, Wide Area Network Administrator

15-0000 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS 20

15-2011 Actuaries
Analyze statistical data, such as mortality, accident, sickness, disability, and retirement rates and construct probability tables to forecast risk and liability for payment of future benefits. May ascertain insurance rates required and cash reserves necessary to ensure payment of future benefits.
Illustrative examples: Actuarial Mathematician, Health Actuary, Insurance Actuary

15-2000 Mathematical Science Occupations

15-2010 Actuaries
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-2011 Actuaries

15-1299 Computer Occupations, All Other
All computer occupations not listed separately. Excludes “Computer and Information Systems Managers” (11-3021), “Computer Hardware Engineers” (17-2061), “Electrical and Electronics Engineers” (17-2070), “Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary” (25-1021), “Special Effects Artists and Animators” (27-1014), “Graphic Designers” (27-1024), “Health Information Technologists and Medical Registrars” (29-9021), and “Computer, Automated Teller, and Office Machine Repairers” (49-2011).

Illustrative examples: Computer Console Operator, Computer Laboratory Technician, Data Center Operator Design digital user interfaces or websites. Develop and test layouts, interfaces, functionality, and navigation menus to ensure compatibility and usability across browsers or devices. May use web framework applications as well as client-side code and processes. May evaluate web design following web and accessibility standards, and may analyze web use metrics and optimize websites for marketability and search engine ranking. May design and test interfaces that facilitate the human-computer interaction and maximize the usability of digital devices, websites, and software with a focus on aesthetics and design. May create graphics used in websites and manage website content and links. Excludes “Special Effects Artists and Animators” (27-1014) and “Graphic Designers” (27-1024).

Illustrative examples: Digital Designer, Graphic Web Designer, Web Content Specialist

15-1290 Miscellaneous Computer Occupations
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-1299 Computer Occupations, All Other

15-1254 Web Developers
Develop and implement websites, web applications, application databases, and interactive web interfaces. Evaluate code to ensure that it is properly structured, meets industry standards, and is compatible with browsers and devices. Optimize website performance, scalability, and server-side code and processes. May develop website infrastructure and integrate websites with other computer applications. Excludes “Special Effects Artists and Animators” (27-1014).

Illustrative examples: Intranet Developer, Web Applications Developer, Web Architect

15-1255 Web and Digital Interface Designers

15-0000 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS 21
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-2051 Data Scientists

15-2051 Data Scientists
Develop and implement a set of techniques or analytics applications to transform raw data into meaningful information using data-oriented programming languages and visualization software. Apply data mining, data modeling, natural language processing, and machine learning to extract and analyze information from large structured and unstructured datasets. Visualize, interpret, and report data findings. May create dynamic data reports. Excludes “Statisticians” (15-2041), “Cartographers and Photogrammetrists” (17-1021), and “Health Information Technologists and Medical Registrars” (29-9021).

Illustrative examples: Business Intelligence Developer, Data Analytics Specialist, Data Mining Analyst, Data Visualization Developer

15-2041 Statisticians
Develop or apply mathematical or statistical theory and methods to collect, organize, interpret, and summarize numerical data to provide usable information. May specialize in fields such as biostatistics, agricultural statistics, business statistics, or economic statistics. Includes mathematical and survey statisticians. Excludes “Survey Researchers” (19-3022).

Illustrative examples: Biostatistician, Statistical Analyst, Time Study Statistician

15-2050 Data Scientists

Illustrative examples: Operations Analyst, Procedure Analyst, Process Analyst

15-2040 Statisticians
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-2041 Statisticians

15-2030 Operations Research Analysts
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-2031 Operations Research Analysts

15-2031 Operations Research Analysts
Formulate and apply mathematical modeling and other optimizing methods to develop and interpret information that assists management with decision making, policy formulation, or other managerial functions. May collect and analyze data and develop decision support software, services, or products. May develop and supply optimal time, cost, or logistics networks for program evaluation, review, or implementation.
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-2021 Mathematicians

15-2021 Mathematicians
Conduct research in fundamental mathematics or in application of mathematical techniques to science, management, and other fields. Solve problems in various fields using mathematical methods.

Illustrative examples: Algebraist, Cryptographer, Cryptographic Vulnerability Analyst

15-2020 Mathematicians

15-0000 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS 22

Illustrative examples: Harmonic Analyst, Mathematical Engineering Technician

15-2090 Miscellaneous Mathematical Science Occupations
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

15-2099 Mathematical Science Occupations, All Other

15-2099 Mathematical Science Occupations, All Other
All mathematical scientists not listed separately.

17-0000 COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL OCCUPATIONS 23

17-2010 Aerospace Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2011 Aerospace Engineers

17-1022 Surveyors
Make exact measurements and determine property boundaries. Provide data relevant to the shape, contour, gravitation, location, elevation, or dimension of land or land features on or near the earth’s surface for engineering, map-making, mining, land evaluation, construction, and other purposes.

Illustrative examples: Geodetic Surveyor, Land Surveyor, Mineral Surveyor

17-2000 Engineers

17-1021 Cartographers and Photogrammetrists
Research, study, and prepare maps and other spatial data in digital or graphic form for one or more purposes, such as legal, social, political, educational, and design purposes. May work with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). May design and evaluate algorithms, data structures, and user interfaces for GIS and mapping systems. May collect, analyze, and interpret geographic information provided by geodetic surveys, aerial photographs, and satellite data.

Illustrative examples: Digital Cartographer, Mapper, Topographer
Plan and design land areas for projects such as parks and other recreational facilities, airports, highways, hospitals, schools, land subdivisions, and commercial, industrial, and residential sites.

Illustrative examples: Golf Course Architect, Golf Course Designer, Landscape Designer

17-1020 Surveyors, Cartographers, and Photogrammetrists
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

17-1021 Cartographers and Photogrammetrists

17-1022 Surveyors

17-1011 Architects, Except Landscape and Naval
Plan and design structures, such as private residences, office buildings, theaters, factories, and other structural property. Excludes “Landscape Architects” (17-1012) and “Marine Engineers and Naval Architects” (17-2121).

Illustrative examples: Building Architect, Building Architectural Designer, Structural Architect

17-1012 Landscape Architects

17-1000 Architects, Surveyors, and Cartographers

17-1010 Architects, Except Naval
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

17-1011 Architects, Except Landscape and Naval

17-1012 Landscape Architects

17-0000 ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 24

17-2051 Civil Engineers
Design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics, detergents, cement, paper, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering.

Illustrative examples: Fuels Engineer, Plastics Engineer, Polymerization Engineer

17-2050 Civil Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2051 Civil Engineers

Illustrative examples: Biomaterials Engineer, Bio-Mechanical Engineer, Dialysis Engineer

17-2040 Chemical Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2041 Chemical Engineers

17-2041 Chemical Engineers

17-2030 Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2031 Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers

17-2031 Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers
Apply knowledge of engineering, biology, chemistry, computer science, and biomechanical principles to the design, development, and evaluation of biological, agricultural, and health systems and products, such as artificial organs, prostheses, instrumentation, medical information systems, and heath management and care delivery systems.

17-2021 Agricultural Engineers
Apply knowledge of engineering technology and biological science to agricultural problems concerned with power and machinery, electrification, structures, soil and water conservation, and processing of agricultural products.

Illustrative examples: Agricultural Production Engineer, Agricultural Research Engineer, Farm Equipment Engineer
Perform engineering duties in designing, constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft. May conduct basic and applied research to evaluate adaptability of materials and equipment to aircraft design and manufacture. May recommend improvements in testing equipment and techniques.

Illustrative examples: Aeronautical Engineer, Aircraft Design Engineer, Flight Test Engineer

17-2020 Agricultural Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2021 Agricultural Engineers

17-2011 Aerospace Engineers

17-0000 ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 25

17-2081 Environmental Engineers
Research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology.

Illustrative examples: Circuit Design Engineer, Electronic Design Automation Engineer, Telecommunication Engineer

17-2080 Environmental Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2081 Environmental Engineers
Research, design, develop, test, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. Excludes “Computer Hardware Engineers” (17-2061).

Illustrative examples: Electrical Systems Engineer, Illuminating Engineer, Power Distribution Engineer

17-2072 Electronics Engineers, Except Computer
Research, design, develop, or test electronic components and systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use employing knowledge of electronic theory and materials properties. Design electronic circuits and components for use in fields such as telecommunications, aerospace guidance and propulsion control, acoustics, or instruments and controls. Excludes “Computer Hardware Engineers” (17-2061).

Illustrative examples: Computer Hardware Designer, Computer Hardware Developer

17-2070 Electrical and Electronics Engineers
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

17-2071 Electrical Engineers

17-2072 Electronics Engineers, Except Computer

17-2071 Electrical Engineers

17-2060 Computer Hardware Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2061 Computer Hardware Engineers

17-2061 Computer Hardware Engineers
Research, design, develop, or test computer or computer-related equipment for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use. May supervise the manufacturing and installation of computer or computer-related equipment and components. Excludes “Software Developers” (15-1252) and “Web Developers” (15-1254).

Perform engineering duties in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, and water and sewage systems. Includes architectural, structural, traffic, and geotechnical engineers. Excludes “Hydrologists” (19-2043).

Illustrative examples: Bridge Engineer, Construction Engineer, Highway Engineer

17-0000 ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 26
Evaluate materials and develop machinery and processes to manufacture materials for use in products that must meet specialized design and performance specifications. Develop new uses for known materials. Includes those engineers working with composite materials or specializing in one type of material, such as graphite, metal and metal alloys, ceramics and glass, plastics and polymers, and naturally occurring materials. Includes metallurgists and metallurgical engineers, ceramic engineers, and welding engineers.

Illustrative examples: Automotive Sheet Metal Engineer, Forensic Materials Engineer, Metallographer

17-2140 Mechanical Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2141 Mechanical Engineers

Illustrative examples: Marine Architect, Marine Structural Designer, Naval Engineer

17-2130 Materials Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2131 Materials Engineers

17-2131 Materials Engineers

17-2120 Marine Engineers and Naval Architects
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2121 Marine Engineers and Naval Architects

17-2121 Marine Engineers and Naval Architects
Design, develop, and evaluate the operation of marine vessels, ship machinery, and related equipment, such as power supply and propulsion systems.

17-2112 Industrial Engineers
Design, develop, test, and evaluate integrated systems for managing industrial production processes, including human work factors, quality control, inventory control, logistics and material flow, cost analysis, and production coordination. Excludes “Health and Safety Engineers, Except Mining Safety Engineers and Inspectors” (17-2111).

Illustrative examples: Efficiency Engineer, Manufacturing Engineer, Packaging Engineer, Production Engineer
This broad occupation includes the following two detailed occupations:

17-2111 Health and Safety Engineers, Except Mining Safety Engineers and Inspectors

17-2112 Industrial Engineers

17-2111 Health and Safety Engineers, Except Mining Safety Engineers and Inspectors
Promote worksite or product safety by applying knowledge of industrial processes, mechanics, chemistry, psychology, and industrial health and safety laws. Includes industrial product safety engineers.

Illustrative examples: Fire Protection Engineer, Industrial Safety Engineer, Product Safety Engineer

Illustrative examples: Environmental Remediation Engineer, Pollution Control Engineer, Soil Engineer, Water Treatment Plant Engineer

17-2110 Industrial Engineers, Including Health and Safety

17-0000 ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 27

17-2190 Miscellaneous Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2199 Engineers, All Other

17-2199 Engineers, All Other
All engineers not listed separately. Excludes “Sales Engineers” (41-9031), “Locomotive Engineers” (53-4011), and “Ship Engineers” (53-5031).

17-2171 Petroleum Engineers
Devise methods to improve oil and gas extraction and production and determine the need for new or modified tool designs. Oversee drilling and offer technical advice.

Illustrative examples: Natural Gas Engineer, Oil Drilling Engineer, Oil Exploration Engineer
Conduct research on nuclear engineering projects or apply principles and theory of nuclear science to problems
concerned with release, control, and use of nuclear energy and nuclear waste disposal.

Illustrative examples: Atomic Process Engineer, Nuclear Radiation Engineer, Radiation Engineer, Reactor Engineer

17-2170 Petroleum Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2171 Petroleum Engineers

Illustrative examples: Geophysical Engineer, Mineral Engineer, Seismic Engineer

17-2160 Nuclear Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2161 Nuclear Engineers

17-2161 Nuclear Engineers

17-2150 Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers
This broad occupation is the same as the detailed occupation:

17-2151 Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers

17-2151 Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers
Conduct subsurface surveys to identify the characteristics of potential land or mining development sites. May specify the ground support systems, processes, and equipment for safe, economical, and environmentally sound extraction or underground construction activities. May inspect areas for unsafe geological conditions, equipment, and working conditions. May design, implement, and coordinate mine safety programs. Excludes “Petroleum Engineers” (17-2171).

17-2141 Mechanical Engineers
Perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, machines, and other mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of equipment such as centralized heat, gas, water, and steam systems.

Illustrative examples: Combustion Engineer, Engine Designer, Heating and Cooling Systems Engineer, Tool and Die Engineer

17-0000 ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 28
All drafters not listed separately.

Illustrative examples: Blueprint Tracer, Geological Drafter, Marine Drafter

17-3020 Engineering Technologists and Technicians, Except Drafters

17-3013 Mechanical Drafters
Prepare detailed working diagrams of machinery and mechanical devices, including dimensions, fastening methods, and other engineering information.

Illustrative examples: Aeronautical Drafter, Automotive Design Drafter, Tool and Die Designer

17-3019 Drafters, All Other

17-3012 Electrical and Electronics Drafters
Prepare wiring diagrams, circuit board assembly diagrams, and layout drawings used for the manufacture, installation, or repair of electrical equipment.

Illustrative examples: Electrical Computer Aided Design and Drafting Technician, Electrical Systems Drafter, Printed Circuit Board Drafter
This broad occupation includes the following four detailed occupations:

17-3011 Architectural and Civil Drafters

17-3012 Electrical and Electronics Drafters

17-3013 Mechanical Drafters

17-3019 Drafters, All Other

17-3011 Architectural and Civil Drafters
Prepare detailed drawings of architectural and structural features of buildings or drawings and topographical relief maps used in civil engineering projects, such as highways, bridges, and public works. Use knowledge of building materials, engineering practices, and mathematics to complete drawings.

Illustrative examples: Building Drafter, Civil Computer-Aided Design and Drafting Technician, Structural Drafter

Illustrative examples: Calibration Engineer, Metrologist, Optical Engineer, Ordnance Engineer, Photonics Engineer, Salvage Engineer

17-3000 Drafters, Engineering Technicians, and Mapping Technicians

17-3010 Drafters

17-0000 ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 29

Illustrative examples: Mechatronics Technician, Remotely Piloted Vehicle Engineering Technician, Robotics Testing Technician, Unmanned Air Systems Operator

17-3025 Environmental Engineering Technologists and Technicians
Apply theory and principles of environmental engineering to modify, test, and operate equipment and devices used in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental problems, including waste treatment and site remediation, under the direction of engineering staff or scientists. May assist in the development of environmental remediation devices. Apply electrical and electronic theory and related knowledge, usually under the direction of engineering staff, to design, build, repair, adjust, and modify electrical components, circuitry, controls, and machinery for subsequent evaluation and use by engineer